Recent comments

  • Not able to receive SSTV signal   40 weeks 5 days ago

    Hello Kaustav,

    The MAI-75 SSTV experiments were planned at 2 and 3 July in the orbits in range of Moscow.
    In Moscow is the coordinator of this SSTV event.
    So probably SSTV was turned off when the ISS was out of range of Moscow.

    73's Cor PD0RKC

  • UB4UAD   41 weeks 1 day ago

    Congratulations for these great SSTV pictures !

    Best 73 from YO3FVR !

  • UB4UAD   41 weeks 1 day ago

    ... and no other comments !

  • ISS PASSES   41 weeks 2 days ago

    Welcome Mike,

    Maybe open http://maps.google.com and verify your Latitude and Longitude for your location.
    http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Longitude-and-Latitude-from-Google-Maps

    Check the values you put in to issfanclub.com website. Did you forget the MINUS SIGN? 44.952772,-123.021181 Location for Salem Oregon USA. We are west of London England and use minus Longitude values.

    After posting this, I will check too.
    Don't have a good answer for you question, but share my links below. The "aprs tracking" app was valuable to see. Thanks for pointing it out. I had not used it before.

    I am a simple Ham Radio Operator and use http://heavens-above.com with the Tick "ALL Passes"
    to view the crossing times of the ISS from my latitude and longitude. Besides the SKY View look for the Ground Track view to see which way the ISS passes your location. You can also check other visible satellites here.

    There are many other Satellite tracking programs that others use. Your mileage may vary.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xiSuLV6sOvI Tutorial on ham radio satellite tracking

    http://www.n2yo.com/ Realtime Satellite Tracking of ISS

    http://spaceweather.com/flybys/ Shows visible Flybys over your Zip code area.

    A google search produced these fine links for "satellite Tracking"
    https://www.google.com/search?q=satellite+Tracking&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=...

  • ISS PASSES   41 weeks 2 days ago

    Welcome Mike,

    Maybe opene http://maps.google.com and verify your Latitude and Longitude for your location.
    Check the values you put in to issfanclub.com website. After posting this, I will check too.
    Don't have a good answer for you question, but share my links below.

    I am a simple Ham Radio Operator and use http://heaves-above.com with the Tick "ALL Passes"
    to view the crossing times of the ISS from my latitude and longitude. Besides the SKY View look for the Ground Track view to see which way the ISS passes your location. You can also check other visible satellites here.

    There are other many other Satellite tracking programs that others use. Your mileage may vary.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xiSuLV6sOvI Tutorial on ham radio satellite tracking

    http://www.n2yo.com/ Realtime Satellite Tracking of ISS

    http://spaceweather.com/flybys/ Shows visible Flybys over your Zip code area.

    A google search produced these fine links for "satellite Tracking"
    https://www.google.com/search?q=satellite+Tracking&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=...

  • ISS Radio Report 36579   41 weeks 2 days ago

    Hello OE5KFM,

    Thanks for the youtube link!
    Now everyone can see how easy it is to receive a strong
    signal from ISS with only a 4 elements yagi.
    With a 3 or 4 elements yagi at fixed elevation at 40 degrees and a cheap TV rotator to control the azimuth its an easy job also for packet communications.

    73s Cor PD0RKC
    Yaesu FT897D & Kenwood TS790, 9 elements crossyagi.

  • Help with scanner antenna..please!   41 weeks 2 days ago

    145.825 Mhz for Packet first, usually hear the packet racket when the satellite comes over your horizon about a 1000 mile radius from your location.
    My reasoning, is that since packet is normally always working you can hear when the ISS is in your area. Since Amateur Radio astronaut Commander Douglas Wheelock has left, not often that the ISS crew turns on the Amateur radio to make Voice QSOs with hams in 2013. Their schedule is tight and their free time begins at 20:00 UTC and they go to sleep at 00:00 UTC. So for Pacific Daylight Time ( California West Coast Time Summer) Listen between 12PM PDT and 5PM PDT on 145.800Mhz to hear voice transmissions. Again, check 145.825Mhz FM to check that you can hear the ISS packet activity first. then switch to 145.800. Look for time over USA when they make school contacts. Then you can hear the ISS responses. The ISS is only overhead for about 6 minutes total from horizon to horizon. Add 96 minutes (1 hour + 36 minutes) to start PASS time to have the next pass of the ISS.

    http://www.heavens-above.com will help you find ISS crossing times. Register and input your Latitude / Longitude coordinates. Select all Passes to view daytime ISS crossing. The ground Track view can give you and idea where to point your dipole antenna.

    I made a contact with 15 watts using a 1/4 wave 2 meter mag mount antenna on the roof of my car on July 21, 2010 from Dayton Oregon. Note, that a vertical will get good signal from the horizon when the signal is weak. Less signal when the satellite is directly overhead. Have fun with your Uniden scanner Mattford84
    Check for other Satellite frequencies too.
    Link for 2 Meter Antenna ideas. Use what you have for an antenna. Does not have to be fancy to listen.
    http://www.eham.net/ehamforum/smf/index.php?topic=85788.0

    Check http://ariss.net/ for packet details. Search YouTube for ISS or ARISS
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Y9E-rVu1eo California Students Query ISS Crew
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSIAi-t0OQI KF7ETX USNERDOC contacts the ISS Cmdr Douglas Wheelock

    https://www.youtube.com/user/USNERDOC KF7ETX Youtube channel

  • ISS Radio Report 36579   41 weeks 2 days ago

    Erricson handheld 5 watts.
    https://twitter.com/astro_luca/status/340521516305371138/photo/1

    Tell us what antenna you use?

    Cor PD0RKC

  • ISS Radio Report 36579   41 weeks 3 days ago

    HI! According to NASA website, Luca used the HAM Radio in Columbus module.
    I receive packet on 145.825 to the same time as voice on 145.800.

    YouTube Video with voice Downlink

  • ISS Radio Report 36579   41 weeks 3 days ago

    Could not hear the whole contact and the signal was not very high from JN44UT 30 Kms South of Piacenza.
    Does anybody know which radio Luca used, if the Kenwood or the old - I believe - collins from Columbus module?

  • Help with scanner antenna..please!   41 weeks 4 days ago

    great info thank you for the quick reply! i live in california USA

  • Help with scanner antenna..please!   41 weeks 5 days ago

    Hello Mattford84,

    Somethimes ISS crew use the Erricson handheld radio for school contacts wich has
    less power output compared to the ISS Kenwood TM-D700 wich is now used for packet on 145.825Mhz.
    Often wide band scanners does not have verry good receiver sensitivity.
    So that is why you have to connect a good antenna.
    Most wide band scanner antennes have no gain because they are wide in frequency range.

    It depends what you want to do, buy or build an antenna.
    For home made you can start with a 145Mhz dipole antenna.
    ----50cm-------0 0-----50cm-------

    Connect 50 ohm coax to the 0 0.
    The best is to put the dipole antenna on top of your house.
    Or go outside with your scanner and hold the dipole antenna free in the open air.
    But if you dont like to make an antenna you can buy a Diamond X50 antenna and put
    on top of your house.
    And if you can invest more money buy an 145Mhz yagi with rotator (a cheap TV rotor can do).
    Or build this: http://www.open-circuit.co.uk/tape.php
    Build only the antenna you dont need the receiver box cause
    you have a scanner receiver.

    Tell me what country do you life?
    If you life in Europe, tommorow is an ISS school contact with Italia:
    Often AJ9N post ARISS school contact information on the SAREX mailreflector/website:
    http://www.amsat.org/amsat/archive/sarex/48hour/threads.html
    The downlink frequency for ISS school contacts is 145.800Mhz FM/N.

    73's Cor PD0RKC

  • SSTV   41 weeks 6 days ago

    On ARISS-SSTV site (http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com) was published yesterday an announcement regarding SSTV transmissions in the begining of July 2013.

    Best 73!
    YO3FVR

  • MSG on BBS   42 weeks 1 day ago

    Welcome to RS0ISS's message board
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    r 289
    Posted : 17:33:06
    From : EB8ARZ
    To : ALL
    @ BBS :
    Subject:SALUDOS MUNDO

    SALUDOS A TODOS

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    r 285
    Posted : 21:58:34
    From : LU8YY
    To : ALL
    @ BBS :
    Subject:

    Saludos desde San Luis
    Saludos a todos
    los radioafionados y en especial
    a los argentinos en nuestro dia
    73 de Luis LU8YY.

    CMD(F/K/M/R/W/B/H/?)>
    r 284
    Posted : 07:36:37
    From : VE3SCP
    To : ALL
    @ BBS :
    Subject:GREETINGS

    Welcome to RS0ISS's message board
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    r 283
    Posted : 01:14:15
    From : CU3FT
    To : ALL
    @ BBS :
    Subject:hello to all from azores

    hello all
    from azores
    from cu3ft carlos
    terceira island
    best 73's

    CMD(F/K/M/R/W/B/H/?)>

    73 / E20YJC

  • ISS EVA   42 weeks 1 day ago

    Thank you both.

  • ISS EVA   42 weeks 1 day ago

    The Frequency 130.167 sends only the low-power and is difficult to receive.

  • ISS EVA   42 weeks 1 day ago

    The audio on 130.167 is from the Russian Mission controllers being transmitted by the ISS to the EVA crew. The crew responds on some frequencies in the 121 MHz range. The ISS also transmits on 143.625 so you may hear Russian audio there as well.

  • ISS EVA   42 weeks 1 day ago

    I'm brand new to this, so please excuse me if this is a often-answered question, but: what kinds of comms are to be expected on 130.167? Would it include the communication between the two cosmonauts doing the EVA?

    I just tried to listen during a pass here while the EVA was in progress, and heard nothing. (Although, I'm likely doing something wrong since this is my first attempt; to include: not using a Yagi [necessary for this?], trying on a fairly low pass, and/or something else.)

    Was able to hear the digipeater last night on 145.825 MHz, FWIW.

  • ISS EVA   42 weeks 2 days ago

    And it should be noted that both of the frequencies indicated by Satellitenwelt.de are in FM mode. The Frequencies link at the top of the ISS Fan Club page incorrectly lists 130.167 as an AM frequency, but numerous listeners (including myself) have heard the transmissions on this frequency in FM mode.

  • ISS EVA   42 weeks 3 days ago

    130.167 MHz ISS => Suit
    143.625 MHz Reflex of Communication, Activation in Range of Russian ground stations

  • ISS over Athens (Greece) night sky.   44 weeks 5 days ago

    Over the next few days ATV will be approaching ISS. If you have a visible pass of the ISS then you may also see the ATV following a few minutes later.

  • ISS over Athens (Greece) night sky.   44 weeks 5 days ago

    Always nice to see the Space Station visible in the sky.
    The next few days the Space Station will be visible on
    Europe after sunset.
    When the sun "for us on earth" is below the horizon after sunset the Space Station is 400km above earth and sees
    the sun shinning on it, the sunlight reflects on the metal modules thats why we see it as a bright flying star.
    Somethimes ISS is still visible after 1 or 2 or 3 hours after sunset.
    But later the sun is too far below the horizon that it does
    not shine on ISS so its dark.
    For the people who have smartphones download a ISS tracker so you
    can see outside when the ISS comes close to you.
    Or put one of these real time tracker websites in your browser:
    http://www.n2yo.com/
    http://www.isstracker.com/
    Keep in mind the Space Station travels fast with 7km per second.
    Anyway thanks for sharing your video.

    Cor PD0RKC
    http://repeater.ontwikkel.nl

  • Two Radio Hams scheduled to head to ISS today   45 weeks 19 hours ago

    There will never be another Ham operator onboard the ISS like Col. Doug Wheelock. He would talk to anybody when he was on the air. I wish they would bring him back to the ISS. But, with a bad radio, I guess there wouldn't be much of a difference. He was the best operator on the ISS. I made several contacts with the Col. Great person to have a QSO with.

  • Two Radio Hams scheduled to head to ISS today   45 weeks 6 days ago

    Does this mean that currently there is no way to contact the ISS via Amateur Radio? Shawn, K6JVT

  • A Few ISS MSG List Over THAILAND   47 weeks 1 day ago

    May 21, 2013

    Thank you for your message.
    CMD(F/K/M/R/W/B/H/?)>
    l
    Msg# Size TS Date Time From To @ BBS Subject
    345 61 27-Jun/0504 E20YJC>ALL Hi
    342 73 24-Jun/0844 EA1NE >ALL
    339 73 23-Jun/1245 EA1NE >ALL
    338 112 23-Jun/0102 LW5DGM>ALL Hola a todos
    337 106 22-Jun/2328 LW5DGM>ALL Hola!!
    336 108 21-Jun/0415 LW5DGM>ALL Saludo!!
    334 27 $ /1402 WV9E >ALL Greetings
    333 34 $ /1226 WV9E >ALL greetings
    332 30 $ /1225 WV9E >ALL hi
    331 39 /0906 AB9VH >ALL B
    Welcome to RS0ISS's message board
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    r 342
    Posted : 24-Jun-86 08:44:49
    From : EA1NE
    To : ALL
    @ BBS :
    Subject:

    saludos de la EA1NE
    saludos de la EA1NE

    Please report ea1ne@ure.es tnx

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    r 331
    Posted : 09:06:18
    From : AB9VH
    To : ALL
    @ BBS :
    Subject:r 338
    B

    Thank You / 73
    E20YJC